Andrew Heard: Second crocodile killed in search for missing fisherman feared eaten by reptile

A second crocodile has been killed by officials searching for a fisherman feared to have been eaten by the reptiles in Australia.

Wildlife officers euthanised the nearly-three-metre (10ft) crocodile after it was seen with possible human remains in its mouth.

The animal was captured and killed in the area around Hinchinbrook Island in northern Queensland, where Andrew Heard disappeared on Thursday.

The 69-year-old, an experienced fisherman, failed to return from a trip to Gayundah Creek on Hinchinbrook Island between Cairns and Townsville.

His wife raised the alarm after she was unable to contact him by radio.

He never returned and his boat was later found overturned and damaged at around 2.30pm on Friday, the Guardian said.

On Sunday, police confirmed that human remains had been found inside a four-metre (13ft) crocodile that was believed to be “involved” in Mr Heard’s presumed death.

Wildlife officers thought it “highly likely” one of the reptiles played a part in Mr Heard’s disappearance after they discovered the beast near his empty boat, the Brisbane Times said.

The Cairns Cruising Yacht Squadron, of which he was a “beloved” lifetime member, posted a picture of Mr Heard on its Facebook page, calling him an “all-round legendary” bloke, along with another picture of its flags flying at half mast.

“Our hearts are broken for you and the loss of the love of your life and best mate,” the group said in a post extending its condolences to Mr Heard’s wife, Erica.

“He died doing what he loves best.”

Tests to establish if the second animal contains human remains are under way, police said on Monday and the results will be given to the coroner.

The Queensland premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, called it “an absolute tragedy” and “absolutely horrific”.

It’s the third crocodile attack in Queensland this month with two swimmers in Cairns and Weipa surviving encounters. The animals involved were either killed or relocated to a crocodile farm.

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