UK snow map: Brutal -6C Atlantic deep freeze to deliver ‘heavy snow’ days before Christmas

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A cold front from the Atlantic could deliver snow and sleet over higher ground in the UK just as the festive period arrives. The latest snow probability charts from WXCHARTS show an 80 to 90 percent chance of snow arriving as early as this Wednesday, as the charts turn red in central Scotland. A deep shade of blue and purple then remains until December 16, suggesting a 30 to 50 percent chance of snow in Scotland and north-western England during this time.

Temperatures are also expected to plunge to freezing sub-zero lows by mid-December.

Western parts of Scotland including near Loch Lomond are forecast to be hit with lows of -6C on December 13, according to WXCHARTS.

The freezing lows could linger until December 16, with Liverpool likely to see -1C and London to be blasted by 0C.

The BBC’s long-range forecast between Monday, December 14 and Sunday, December 27, has suggested “heavy wet snow” could fall.

Ladbrokes has also revealed their latest odds for the UK to experience a white Christmas this year.

The latest odds are stacked at 10/11 for snow to fall anywhere in the UK on Christmas Day.

Edinburgh and Newcastle are both expected to be the most likely areas at 3/1.

Alex Apati of Ladbrokes said: “We’re expecting to see the white stuff over the coming days but the latest odds suggest it might stick around until at least Christmas.”

Netweather also predicted snow in its long-range forecast.

For the period December 14 to 22, it said: “Although the emphasis is expected to be mainly on cold dry weather, the chances of lowland snowfall increase during this period, most likely from wintry showers near north-facing coasts from short-lived northerlies or from frontal systems pushing eastwards against cold air masses.”

The BBC’s long-range forecast said: “The middle of December will continue to see a strong ridge of high pressure over the north Atlantic.

“This will steer areas of low pressure south-east across the UK, France and then down into southern Europe.

“Spells of rain and brisk winds, especially over southern parts of the UK.

“It should be cold enough for some of the rain to fall as sleet and snow, especially over higher elevations, but not exclusively so.

“Some heavy wet snow falling to low levels cannot be completely excluded – we’ve seen it before in recent Decembers with a similar weather pattern, such as 2011 and especially 2017.

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“Once the low pressure areas track away to the south of the UK, there will tend to be two or three days with gentle winds, sunnier skies but also some cold air, with overnight frost.”

The forecast added low pressure could sweep wet and windy weather over north-western parts of the UK during the week of Christmas.

The forecast said: “It’s too early to make a prediction of what the weather will be like over the UK on Christmas Day itself, but we can look at what the latest forecast guidance is suggesting for the week as whole.

“A consensus of the latest predictions suggest that high pressure will start to build over France, Germany and southern England.

“Meanwhile, low pressure track starts to shift further north than earlier in December.

“This would suggest a trend to less cold weather, as winds over the UK come in from the south-west more often.

“North-western have the greatest chance of wet and windy weather, while the southern and eastern half of the UK will become drier and more settled, but with some mist and fog.”

The Met Office added colder conditions could arrive from the Atlantic between Monday, December 14 and Monday, December 28.

The forecast said: “Despite some mixed signals, typical early winter weather with periods of persistent rain and showery interludes seems slightly more likely, with winds and weather systems more likely to arrive from the Atlantic.

“Although confidence is low, in this pattern the best of the driest and brightest weather will be in the south and east.

“Frost and fog patches are likely during any settled spells, and any wintry precipitation is most likely over high ground of the north and northwest.

“Conditions in the southwest could turn more settled through the month. There is a risk of gales at times, with the strongest winds being seen to the north and northwest. Temperatures overall likely to be near or slightly above average.”

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